Research

At Georgetown College, research unites faculty, graduate students and undergraduate students in the search for new knowledge through academic methods of inquiry. As senior scholars, faculty express and pursue the most ambitious questions in their fields while inviting inviting students to participate in a process of inquiry, exploration, and discovery. Students join in this research in classrooms, laboratories, archives, and the field, all the while gaining valuable training and mentorship from their faculty advisors. At the College, both the new knowledge generated by research and the process of inquiry itself are central to the education and formation of students.


Research News

Millan crouches over New Zealand hot spring collecting sample

Postdoctoral Fellow Maëva Millan and Professor Sarah Stewart Johnson Conduct First-of-Its-Kind Research Searching for Organic Molecules on Red Planet

November 16th, 2021

In a paper published in Nature Astronomy, Georgetown Postdoctoral Fellow Maëva Millan and her advisor, Sarah Stewart Johnson, Provost’s Distinguished Associate Professor in the Department of Biology and Science, Technology, and International Affairs Program, share their findings from the very first “wet chemistry derivatization” experiment performed on Mars, where NASA’s Curiosity Rover landed in August 2012. 

Study by Psychology Professors Johnson and Phillips Shows Successes, Struggles of Students During Distance Learning

November 5th, 2021

Professors in the Department of Psychology Anna Johnson, Ph.D., and Deborah Phillips, Ph.D., partnered with researchers at the University of Oklahoma on the Tulsa SEED Study, which follows a diverse group of children to understand the effects of attending Tulsa pre-K on their learning and development. The study surveyed a group of parents of first-graders both in the summer of 2020 and again in the summer of 2021 about their experiences of the pandemic during the 2019-2020 and 2020–2021 school years. 

Which Witch: Two Professors Use Historical Research to Teach Class on Different Forms of Witchcraft from Around the World

October 29th, 2021

Alison Games, Ph.D. and Dorothy M. Brown Distinguished Professor of History, and Amy Leonard, Ph.D., professor of History and director of undergraduate studies, co-instruct the course Witches and Witchcraft in the Early Modern World. The two professors developed and teach this class because the “study of witchcraft is an entry point into everything that makes us human.”